How to Wire a Canvas

How to Wire a Canvas

Do you have some art that just hasn’t made it to the wall? or are you an artist and have been sending your pieces out to be stretched and wired? Stretching and wiring a canvas are both easy things that can be done from your studio space. This week I will cover wiring. Next week I will cover stretching a canvas.

Here is what you will need to wire your piece.

  • Two D-rings
  •  4 screws (No more than 5/8″ in length)
  • Ruler or measuring tape
  • Wire – Gauge will depend on canvas weight. Read package for information when purchasing. (I always buy the 43LB plastic coated wire.)
  • Wire cutters
  • Screw driver or drill
  • Pencil

Christine Olmstead Wire Canvas

First you must decide the orientation of the painting. Will you hang it vertically or horizontally? Once you’ve decided what direction the piece will hang measure that length. So for this example, I wired a vertical piece that is 20”x40.”

First divide the vertical side by 4. 40/4 = 10. Take your tape measure and mark with your pencil 10 inches (or ¼ of your vertical piece) mark it on both sides.

Christine Olmstead Wire Canvas

Take your D-rings and angle them slightly into the canvas, one to the left, the other to the right. Take two of the screw and screw them in one of each of the D-ring’s two holes. Adjust the angle as necessary and screw in the last two screws.Christine Olmstead Wire Canvas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take your wire and measure double the width of your piece. My width was 20” so my wire should be 40”. Snip the double width wire and string it through both rings and center the wire so there should be 10” of wire on either side of the piece through the wires. Pull the wire slightly so there is a little slack, but not so much that the wire extends over top of the frame. Pinch the wire and tie it in a knot in each D-ring once after you’ve chosen your desired slack.

Christine Olmstead Wire Canvas

Once knotted twist the excess wire back up the tightened side to ensure no slipping and so that the owner can add wire slack if desired. And that is it, wiring a piece is pretty easy.

Christine Olmstead Wire Canvas

Christine Olmstead Wire Canvas

And Whala! Your piece is ready to hang. Just make sure you’re using strong enough wire and D-rings by checking their tested weight. It should be on their packaging! Good luck!

Christine Olmstead Wire Canvas

 

 

Graceful Email

Graceful Email

What broken email taught me about Grace.

It has been 1 week since my email has been down. I have not been able to send or receive email to info@christineolmstead.com. The problem is still not fixed and I have no way of replying to client emails.

This problem has stressed me out beyond what I thought was possible. Here’s why this email problem has driven me to insanity.

  1. I feel like a flake.

What must the kind, patient people who I’ve been conversing with over email be thinking of me? “Oh.. so she’s the kind of person who writes an email  and then just blows you off for weeks at a time. On second thought, I don’t think I want to work with her.” At least, that’s what I might be thinking if someone didn’t respond to professional emails for a week. To which I respond, “I AM SO SORRY ITS NOT ABOUT YOU ITS ABOUT TECHNOLOGY!”

  1. I feel inept.

I genuinely cannot fix this problem till the guy who currently hosts my email fixes it. I am powerless and at the mercy of his skills and time. The problem is that I don’t even know what must be done to fix it and since he is the only one with access to my email server (I don’t even have access) I feel like a technology hostage.

  1. I feel like I’ve lost business.

Without even being able to set an auto responder message like, “Thanks for contacting me, but right now my email server is down and I don’t know when it will be fixed, please email me at X address in the meantime” I can’t set up an auto responder because my email doesn’t send mail. So even if I had an auto responder, it wouldn’t send.

What I’ve realized though all this is it’s ok if people can’t reach me in an instant, and it’s ok if I can’t respond right away. If people don’t have the grace to be patient with me, then they’re probably not the kind of people I want to work with anyways.

Another lesson I’ve learned is if someone takes a long time to reply to my emails in the future, to be ok with it. I have no idea what that person is going through and why it took them a long time to reply. They could have had a personal crisis, (or a broken email crisis :P).

In a world of instant gratification and moving fast, a broken email is a reminder that I don’t need to move at a million miles an hour, in fact, it’s probably better if I don’t.

P.S. if you send me an email… I can’t promise when I will be able to reply.. I’m hoping it will be fixed this week!